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Fairgo - For justice and good government


 



There are two conversations we should have.
For an initial show of interest, send your views to fairgo1986@internode.on.net .
We want an online consultation followed by a political action campaign that produces the desire result for the long term.
1.

Let's move beyond political party differences of opinon over school funding.

Do you agree or disagree that the poorest schools should get twice as much money as the richest and those in between should be scaled on parental ability to pay?

If not, give your suggestions.

 Either way, what is the very best way to fairly allocate both state/territory and federal funding to schools, students or parents based on parental ability to pay?


2.
How are we to enjoy better banking free of the lying, cheating ruthless and predatory practices of our current major banks?

More regulation?
A new government bank?
Customers moving to the better, customer friendly banks?


When will the community have it's say and its way with government?


This is a familiar cry these days and there is a simple answer. "When it asks for it and backs that request with its votes."

It will not happen while people vote on political promises that rarely eventuate, or on favourite party lines or on party leaders.
It will happen when they vote their curent MPs in again or out, on an objective assessment of whether or not those MPs have represented them well in the past.

How many voters have bothered to tell their local MP what they want done on the issues of today?

The media talks of the right of terminally ill patients in terrible pain to end their lives. For years those in the know have just instructed doctors that they do not want life prolonging treatment, but that is not enogh in some cases. How will MPs know what you want if you do not tell them?

Insurance companies and banks are treating customers despicably for the sole purpose of generating the maximum profits possible to pay their CEOs obscene amounts of money or because they do. Customer care comes way down the priority list. Why? Because we fall in love with them, go back to them in the hope that they will reform. Never will they reform! It is by leaving them and going elsewhere that we will encourage them to reform. In 1987 I invented the Moneygram which allowed borrowers to play off one bank against another and give their business to the one offering the best rates and services. That is a negotiating exercise which we used to only experience when visiting Hong Kong or the Philippines. Australia has caught up. We must negotiate hard if we want fair treatment. Otherwise our wealth is transferred with ease to these "financial greed enterprises".

The NSW government is to privatise bus services, fresh from privatising power and land titles. Soon it will have nothing to do but dispense welfare. Perhaps it is a long term plan to abolish the state government and leave government to the Feds and giant local councils.

The NSW government has just commissioned a study, undoubtedly costing millions of dollars paid to private enterprise, that has discovered that  Sydney has millions of rooves onto which solar panels could be placed to generate electricity. Could any high school student not have told the government that for free? There is evidence that our governments are paying our taxes to consultants simply to avoid responsibility for making decisions that any well run community consultation could make in half a day.

F
or all the experts in education, we see that there is an issue with the relative rankings provided by different levels of maths, assewssmentods are antiquated and funding questionable. We already have at least two completely different stories of what the 2017 Federal Budget means for school funding. Do we not understand that our children need to be highly educated to earn a living in the world they inhabit. If we do not attend to this we will be outplayed by other countries and huge numbers of unemployed people will choke our streets. Our poorest children need the very best possible education for life and future careers. Are we telling our politicians that, or are we sitting at home with a beer or glass of wine in hand watching the doubtful quality TV that is dished up to us instead.  The smith Family Ad screams at us "Can't your read?" and "Poverty hurts". Did we see it? React?

We read about massive embezzlement by people in positions of trust. Why do we allow such weak control systems to exist? Do we ask politians to see that our funds are better protected? As a club auditor I once reported massive salary fraud by club directors and executive. Their children and friends were on the payroll multiple times with false names as clever as Mickey Mouse and Elvis Presley. The government agency in charge of clubs was not really interested at all. Directors simply replaced me with another Chartered Accountant as auditor next AGM and the Institute  did not see any need to do anything more about it.

China looks to open a new "Silk Road" to sell its products. We buy them because they are cheap. Do we examine the cost of replacing them more frequently when they wear out? What really got me was the imported wheel brace that twisted like a barber's pole when I went to change a tyre on a country road. Instead of running businesses offering goods and services around the globe online using NBN in relatively cheap inland city premises , we all crowd into coastal capitals at outrageous rents with clogged roads and find we cannot produce much that the world wants at competitive prices. Sure we have a big country with not too much money but if we want jobs and growth, developing cheaper inland online businesses would have to warrant some consideration.Even based in Sydney, I rarely see any of my  debt management or political persuasion clients, because we deal all over Australia by phone and internet. I could as easily be in Bourke.

And lastly we see all the complaints in the world in our letters to the editor. Would we write our complaints about our children in the school magzine? No. We tell them quietly, privately and diplomatically, what we would like them to do and more often than not they will do it, though not necessarily immediately. We need to tell our politicians directly and diplomatically too, exactly what we want them to do. Done properly, they will mostly do it. That has been my experience over 30 years. If they will not or cannot do what we want, then we need to make them stand aside for others who will, which we can do with ease at election time. Telling the media, our family, friends or neighbours is not half as effective as telling the decision-makers themselves, our politicans, all of them and particularly our local ones.


FairGO’s Budget Bulletin
The 2017 Budget has come and gone. It cannot suit everyone. The first year is the only one worth considering. Future projections are often just fantasy.

But the Federal Parliament has been very responsive this year to what voters have had to say in their Votergrams on the following subjects:

Dishonesty, neglect , fraud and debt-trapping customers by banks. Those who have suffered repeated and brutal bashings by big and not-so-big banks have been rewarded. It shows the benefit of sharing problems with politicians who can solve them. As consultants to bank borrowers we adopt the policy of bashing the banks back. That is the only response they understand!

The Government’s previous attempt to give a substantial tax break to the huge public companies who are the richest taxpayers in Australia has so far progressed nowhere.

The tax break for smaller companies with turnover up to $10m returns some of the equity that used to exist, because those family companies find it much harder than public companies to raise funds.

Housing unaffordability is the product of deliberate government policy to boost the failing economy through capital city construction work and providing a “safe haven” for foreign money. The proposed inland rail line from Melbourne to Brisbane provides the greatest solution to affordable housing with development of many beautiful country cities backed by NBN’s global internet access and unbelievably inexpensive land available for housing. Many government departments have already made the move and more will follow.

We applaud the tax levy to fund NDIS. We all want our money spent wisely but we also recognise that if we want government services we need to contribute taxes to fund them.

However, many will welcome announcements designed to prevent people cheating their fellow Australians by claiming welfare payments to which they are not entitled, but we do not need any repeats of the centrelink robo-debt fiasco. Those in genuine need deserve welfare or help to earn income and much of that can be done online by those confined to home.

Education funding on a needs base has long been the basis of Votergram campaigns and the budget claimed to be doing that. However we would need to see the per student funding for actual schools to be satisfied. The Naplan confusions needs parental guidance to government via Votergrams to MPs.

Cuts to university funding would seem to be unconstructive. A rebuilding of TAFE is probably one move that is required. There is merit in people working in their chosen career along with their university courses on that subject, as many have done for decades. Should uni course be free to those who do them just to acquire knowledge rathr than for any income earninig purpose?

Those concerned about foreign staff taking jobs of Australians will be pleased about some modest measures to protect Australian jobs. This links with the education measures to ensure that all Australians are well educated for the knowledge based jobs of the future as mechanisation, IT and Robots take less skilled jobs.

More police funding to fight major organised crime, child exploitation and terrorism is a fair response to what many have campaigned for. Of these, terrorism is probably the least dangerous to our society at present.

Campaigns for better child care funding seem to have been answered at least in part.

Even government agencies refer people to us for unfair trading and so it is pleasing to see the $10m fines for those who rip off consumers.

Our campaigns, along with others,  against domestic violence have produced $39m worth of improvements by way of community legal centres and $3.4m for specialist domestic violence units. The long-term multi-generational cost of domestic violence is huge and a reduction would have enormous economic as well as social benefits.

What the budget shows is that democracy works well when voters become involved enough to engage with politicians on matters of concern and persist until they get a fair go.

Our new voters.network, on which we have been working steadily over the past year, will provide an additional way of doing that alongside the existing Votergram service to all MPs and FairGO’s campaign management.

Keep campaigning. Politicians can be very responsive when approached in the right way. It is the key to good government.

Let us know if you need a hand to enjoy a fair go, in any field at all.

Best regards,
Greg




What do you think of these housing affordability solutions?
Eliminate negative gearing which some say mainly profits banks because the point of” negative gearing “ is to borrow so much money to buy your rental property that you make an annual loss. That loss is tax deductible and you get about 30c off tax for every $1 your interest bill exceeds rent received. Why spend a dollar to gain 30 cents? Because the more people who buy like this, the higher the price of  property goes, and the negative gearing investor counts on making a greater non-taxable capital gain when selling the property than the 70c lost on every $1 of interest deducted. The scheme has to force home prices up in order to work.It deliberately makes housing unaffordable and forces people to rent.

Develop inland cities where housing is very affordable, the air is pure and a 5 minute traffic jam the worst seen. Create thousands of jobs by road, rail, air transport, government departments, schools, hospitals, home and office building. NBN gives global access for service and sales businesses. I have advised businesses, individuals and farmers on how to use debt to generate profits rather than problems, all over Australia by phone, fax, mail and email for 30 years and never met most of my clients. Often I have done that from inland Australia. It is just beautiful in “The Bush”.

Limit residential property ownership to those who have been Australian residents for at least 10 years. That would eliminate foreigners using Australian housing as a “safe haven” for their money, sometime proceeds of tax evasion or crime. By doing that, they force prices for Aussies up!

Allow people to invest their superannuation in their home provided that they always maintain those super contributions in a home. So if they sell one home there is a caveat that they must re-invest the same amount of superannuation in another home. Your home is the best form of super, as you control it and pay no tax on the benefit it gives you. Super fund managers just make huge amounts of money out of managing your superannuation and lobby the government not to let you have use of it. The best thing you can have in old age is a home that you can occupy rent-free.

"Friend" FairGO on Facebook and let us have your own thoughts there.


Evasion is a Game Big Businesses Play
Some reformers were dancing with glee today at the newly passed “Google Tax” giving our government “some of the world's strongest anti-tax dodging legislation”. Really? Or is that just government propaganda?

The penalty is only 10c in $1 and the chance of conviction about 1 in 100 so most global corporations will risk it. Their tax accountants and lawyers will have already worked out how to avoid it or fight it in court for so long that a cheap negotiated settlement will result in a slap on the wrist.

ATO need funds to fight the teams of tax experts that will fight any assessment it issues, yet the government limits its funding.

The law will probably encourage many global corporations to shift production of goods and services offshore, inserting The Philippines, India or China between a tax haven and Australian sales. The taxable income will be earned in the tax haven from production in the low wage Asian countries. Only scraps will be earned in Australia. Aussie banks based in tax havens will just finance the global corporations in the “middle country”, so their cut will not see the ATO either.

Wage earners suffer most with massive costs of housing and feeding families and marginal tax rates of up to 45% plus 10% gst on much of their spending . We would like to hear your views on that and post them.

Communist Chinese Government owned enterprises will be exempt from the laws as will be foreign owned equity and superannuation funds.

Proving that the gaining of a tax benefit was the primary rather than an incidental purpose in how a business has been structured has been a thorn in the side of those wanting fairness in taxation since a Liberal aligned judge killed off the anti-avoidance provisions in the 1936.It will continue to be.

If voters want to reinstate fair tax laws they will be well advised to join voters.network free and make a combined, concerted long term effort to persuade politicians that their continued jobs as local representatives will depend in part on fairer tax laws that see those who can afford to pay most doing just that. Major public companies are right at the top of the list and get away with murder at present thanks to compliant politicians. It is the people who drive jobs by buying what is produced. They are the ones who need tax breaks. They don’t often award themselves Million dollar salaries and bonuses. Voters.network will make a big difference if a lot of Australians join in.

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